Voice

I let my mouth carry sound.

The sound comes from nothing,

an empty echo for the comfort of myself and others.

The act creates loss within.

Why is not silence honoured?

Why can we not be in another’s presence and wait?

Wait for the words to be primed by reflection –

to spill forth and overflow from the heart.

Give our heart-thoughts voice.

Voice to feed, fill and overflow – to overflow

into the life of another, the fullness of which imploring action.

Instead

connection is prostituted to save face; the opinion

of the perceived other too great to gamble.

So we sit

engage in interesting conversation, letting our mouths carry sound –

competing in being informed, competing for knowledge; knowledge by rote –

society perceiving this transaction as intelligent.

We become a cog, transferring external motion to engage with another,

unconsciously devaluing internal discoveries –

the cost of which is life-altering.

And then

the heart cries out – only to comprehend an empty echo.

The heart manifests itself in a foreign land, expecting to be recognised –

but it is not.

So

it depresses,

and wears the armour of pain.

But alas, western culture recognises pain, and will treat it like a trespasser,

coming forth with an anti-aid –

anti depressant.

This pain is not a tolerated tourist, it is not welcome to explore this foreign land –

tourist guides are certainly not available on the front line!

and so

we are presented with a choice.

Do we accept passive aid, huddled and relieved, shying away from the murky waters below?

Do we continue to prostitute in hope of pseudo connection?

Or

do we stand in the depths of who we are, while we are –

allowing the overflow to seep into the recesses, showing us?

If I choose to stand in my own depths, perhaps then when I speak,

I won’t sound an empty echo.

Instead my sound will resonate within myself; within another,

and their sound within me.

~ Kelly Hartland

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12 thoughts on “Voice

  1. When it comes to waiting for words to be primed, I have lamentably stumbled over and again. Only after hitting the send button, do I later regret my impulsivity. I don’t understand how I can be socially in tune at times yet so inept in others for this very same reason.

    Thank you, dear Kelly for honoring silence long enough to listen to the whispers of new insights as you do.

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    • Thank you lovely vicenzo 😀

      That darn send button in such a convenient location! Why!?

      It’s funny isn’t it; social awkwardness. I don’t experience this with my best friends, because we tend to wait for the ‘priming’ before speaking, and then relish in one another’s discoveries.
      It’s when I’m around people that just ‘talk’ and then they patiently wait for others to finish talking – so that they can talk again. I can feel and be really awkward in these times – and to be blunt; not inspired nor inspiring.
      So, I often remain silent – I have even been known to pick up a book and read in the presence of these people. Soooo… socially inept you say? me too! 😛

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      • My daughter and I have those kinds of flowing conversations too dear Kelly. I wish I could say I have other pals, like her in realtime, but … as the song goes… “God makes all things beautiful in His time.” I suppose that is why I treasure friends like you even though we communicate through cyberspace.

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      • Sorry for the delayed response to your comment vincenzo – I actually did respond that day, and before I completed my comment the computer refreshed itself (or something glitchy).
        So, what I was ‘going’ to say was something better than this – of course ;)… You sound like a ‘dream’ dad. How many young women could of found themselves a more deserving man – if only their fathers had of shown them their true value early on in their lives.
        And yes, we shouldn’t take for granted any like minded connections we are fortunate enough to make – even through cyberspace. 🙂

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  2. I would appreciate your prayers for my daughter Kelly. Apart from her parents she doesn’t have other connections. She cannot relate to her peers as they are years behind her in maturity — even kids in her youth group. She feels out of sorts because they talk trivialities… I’ve mentored gifted children as part of my role as an educator, and these adolescent years are indeed challenging for them as most of their peers are adults.

    Like

    • Yeah, wow. Adolescence – who would want to do that again!
      That’s a really tough place for your daughter.
      Thankfully she has you guys to connect with.
      Mentoring gifted children as part of your role sounds interesting.

      Like

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